The Value of Self-Correction and Student Ownership


This year I’m continuing to find that student ownership plays a critical role in the learning process.  Students often become more responsible for their own learning when they are given additional opportunities to show their learning.  I’m finding that part of the key to increasing student responsibility depends on how it’s communicated by the teacher.  Students can’t be expected to own their learning without any guidance.  The gradual release of student responsibility can benefit the overal climate and achievement of a classroom.  In the past, I’ve used student journaling, plus/delta, surveys, choice boards, self-selected research projects, and other strategies to promote student ownership.  This past week I introduced another strategy that involves self-correction.  Here are the steps:

1.)  Students complete an assignment in collaborative groups or independently.

2.)  Students finish the assignment and self-correct using the Teacher’s Manual.  This can also be applied to digital progress monitoring tools.

3.)  Students independently use markers to indicate wrong/right answers.  If needed, students will write in correct answers.

4.)  Students utilize their math journals to reflect on the assignment and their feelings about the topic and achievement.

5.)  Student turn in their paper and journal to the teacher

6.)  Optional:  Students use multiple journal entries for individual goal setting

It might seem simple, but I’ve had terrific results from using this strategy.  Overall, I feel as though the students benefit from practices like this.  The self-correcting / journal process took modeling and practice at first, but the benefits are starting to become apparent.

Building Student Rapport

Image by:  Keerati


Building rapport is essential in any organization.  In a school setting, developing student/teacher and parent/teacher rapport  can lead to increased learning.  Developing a positive relationship takes time and is often not discussed in teacher preparation courses.  Like many teachers find out, this topic is often part of the ‘on-the-job’ experience and evident during the first year of teaching.

To be an effective teacher, students need to understand that everyone at the school is there to support their learning.  Building student rapport is vital and that positive relationship often encourages students to learn at optimal levels.  Having stellar rapport can lead to increased student confidence.  Increased student confidence may lead to increased achievement. How do you build appropriate student/teacher rapport?  The list below isn’t all-encompassing, but I’ve used and found success with many of the ideas below. I’ve included a link in each line for more information.


What are some activities or strategies that you use to improve rapport?

Students That Own Their Learning

Image by:  Jscreationzs


After working on a math world problem for approximately five minutes I hear ….

“I don’t get this”

“I’m confused”

“I’m lost”

“I don’t know what to do”

I believe every educator has heard one or more of the above statements while teaching.  These statements don’t really help a student succeed in any class.  This type of student feedback is important, but the words themselves seem discouraging. When words like the above are communicated, I feel as though the classroom instruction isn’t meeting the students’ needs or students aren’t utilizing math problem solving strategies.  This post is going to focus on math problem solving strategies.

Image by:  I. Images

Teaching new math concepts often requires building on students’ background knowledge.  When students experience a challenging math problem, they generally have two options.  Students can become frustrated and quit or they can find a solution.  A discussion regarding this particular situation took place in the past after their was a major struggle with one particular math word problem.  As a class we had a brainstorming session.  The students came up with some ideas of how to overcome mathematical struggles.  We called these strategies the math tool belt.

During this discussion, the students began to recognize that the teacher will not solve all of their problems.   I pointed out that giving an answer without support isn’t learning.  In fact, I pointed out that I will help, guide, and assist, but they are responsible for completing the problem.  Making mistakes and having “I don’t know” moments are part of the learning process.  Having students reflect on their learning through journal writing may also benefit the student.  I feel that students should “own” or take responsibility for their own learning as @pammoran, @mthorton78, and @irasocol indicate.

Long-term retention infrequently occurs when students are required to just regurgitate what the teacher says.  Here are some of the math problem solving strategies we decided to use when confronting a complicated math word problem:

  • Read the problem and underline important numbers or information.
  • Cross out information that isn’t needed
  • Create a visual model (chart, graph, or table)
  • Indicate what operations will be needed
  • Restate in your own words what the question is asking
  • Work backwards – keeping the end in mind
  • Write steps needed to solve the problem
  • Guess and check
  • Look for a pattern
  • Estimate and use logical reasoning to solve
  • Use manipulatives to solve (students can just grab them off the shelf and use as needed)
  • Use a formula
  • Work in collaborative groups to brainstorm what steps can be taken to solve the problem
  • Use a ratio / proportion to solve the problem
  • Ask the teacher for help
In an effort to foster resilient and responsible citizens, I ask the students what problem solving tool they used before they ask me for help.  This also reminds the students that they should be utilizing the tool immediately in the learning process.  I believe that students need to understand that their effort (not mine) leads to individual achievement.  Creating a classroom environment that encourages learning through engaging and relevant instruction is vital, but I feel as though students need to “own the classroom and their learning.”  When students are stumped or are struggling with a math problem, they need to have the tool belt readily available to power through the obstacle.  Giving opportunities to utilize the tool belt gives students positive experiences of overcoming obstacles and builds confidence. Students become owners of their learning and they find that their learning experiences are primarily controlled by how they react to the problem.  Overcoming obstacles will develop confidence so that the next time they encounter a complicated problem they will reach for the tool belt and be successful.

 Additional Resources: